Category Data

Demography and Family: A Microsimulation Strategy to Bridge the Gap

The study of the family has had a long and distinguished history in the demographic research tradition.[1] A central preoccupation of this early work was the development of methods to obtain information about family structures from basic demographic characteristics of populations. As a result of this work, we learned to adapt classic life table methods […]

ISIS violence against Yazidis in Iraq

Valeria Cetorelli writes about results of a new survey that estimates the extent of ISIS violence against Yazidis in Iraq. During the summer of 2014, ISIS subjugated the Nineveh governorate in northern Iraq, home to most of Iraq’s minority groups. These minorities were systematically targeted by ISIS in a violent campaign to ‘purify’ the region […]

Working with spatial data to generate a consistent demographic time series

In this post, Ilya Kashnitsky shows how we can use freely available data and statistical software to create a consistent demographic time series. NUTS stands for the Nomenclature of Territorial Units For Statistics. The history of NUTS dates back to the beginning of 1970s, when European countries developed unified standards for systems of administrative geography. It was […]

Malaria importation from Africa to China driven by investment and migrant workers

Shangjie Lai writes about the role of migration in transmission routes of malaria between sub-Saharan Africa and China. The international spread of infectious diseases including Plasmodium falciparum malaria has been accelerated by increasing human mobility via air travel over recent decades. An emerging route of P. falciparum infection is from Africa to China by Chinese […]

Examining the Urban and the Rural

This is a post by Ashira Menashe-Oren on varying age structures between rural and urban areas in Sub-Saharan Africa and their consequences. The rural-urban dichotomy is the one of the most common classifications used to describe population distribution within a country. Available for many data sources, it is a simple binary measure. It is universally […]

The challenges in researching the demographic consequences of conflict: Reflections on the Sierra Leonean civil war, 1991-2002

This post is by Amie Kamanda, and discusses the importance of and challenges in investigating the demographic consequences of conflict. In particular, some of the problems in obtaining reliable data in times of conflict are discussed with reference to Amie’s work on the Civil War in Sierra Leone. Importance of researching the demographic consequences of conflict […]

Exploring the limits of household surveys in Africa

In this post, LSE’s Ernestina Coast and UCL’s Sara Randall outline the importance of accuracy of data taken in international surveys to ensure poverty-related data are high quality. Poverty statistics often depend on household-level measurements from survey data, making the definition of household of critical importance. Many policy-makers, government agencies and researchers see poverty as […]

African Health Statistics

MamaYe has announced the launch of an innovative data site which allows you to chart, map and compare key health indicators across all 54 African Union member states. After months of carefully gathering data, deciding the indicators, testing the codes, designing how the numbers will be translated into graphs or maps, and consulting with governments […]

Causal inference

Does working as a researcher cause your eyesight to become strained, your back to become hunched, and your social life to become rather limited? Or is this just an association? The fact that I’m even asking this question probably suggests that I need to get out more. But the question of causality arises frequently in […]

What are data? Exploring the question that no one asks

There is evidence that people fundamentally differ in their understanding of data. Three (implicit) philosophies speak of data as objective facts (measurements), as subjective observations (records), and as communications (signs). An example explains what this means in practice. The case study below is adapted from Brian Ballsun-Stanton’s PhD thesis Asking about data. He is an […]

Modelling Demographic Processes using Agent-Based Simulation

Agent-Based Simulation (ABS) is not yet a common-place term in demographic circles: a quick search of some of the major demographic journals yields not more than a handful of articles that use this or similar terms, and fewer still that have tackled research questions from this perspective. Despite this, it is a methodology which has […]

Is it possible to accurately measure migration?

This is a guest post by Edward Morgan (BSc FRGS). Edward is a master’s student studying Population and Development at the London School of Economics. Edward is a Geography graduate of the University of St Andrews and a former public health consultant to the Met Office. For more information, visit his webpage. Earlier this week, […]

Homage to the Lexis diagram

The Lexis diagram belongs in the demographer’s toolbox like a mechanic’s wrench. It is the essential tool for visualizing lifelines and events as they occur along the intersection of age, (time) period and (birth) cohort. This means it is of great use to scientists doing longitudinal, time-to-event and even time series analyses. As such, it […]

The origins of population statistics: a glimpse at the UK

With the release of the Demotrends blog, I started wondering about the origins of my discipline. What was the first population statistic? Which population did it enumerate? And who created it? I wasn’t thinking about a simple headcount – the campfire estimate of an ancestor like Lucy (if indeed she could count?), but something a […]