The study of the family has had a long and distinguished history in the demographic research tradition.[1] A central preoccupation of this early work was the development of methods to obtain information about family structures from basic demographic characteristics of populations. As a result of this work, we learned to adapt classic life table methods […]

Jessica Nisén writes about educational differences in fertility among men. Interest and literature on fertility patterns of men is on the increase among demographers. While educational differences in women’s fertility have been well documented, there is less corresponding research on men. The long-standing finding that women educated to higher levels often end up childless and […]

Nikkil Sudharsanan writes about the size and drivers of adult life expectancy disparities between socio-economic strata in Indonesia. For over 40 years, researchers have found that high socioeconomic status (SES) individuals in high-income countries live longer than individuals with low SES. Although these findings have existed for decades, interest in mortality inequality has surged in […]

Valeria Cetorelli writes about results of a new survey that estimates the extent of ISIS violence against Yazidis in Iraq. During the summer of 2014, ISIS subjugated the Nineveh governorate in northern Iraq, home to most of Iraq’s minority groups. These minorities were systematically targeted by ISIS in a violent campaign to ‘purify’ the region […]

In this post, Ilya Kashnitsky shows how we can use freely available data and statistical software to create a consistent demographic time series. NUTS stands for the Nomenclature of Territorial Units For Statistics. The history of NUTS dates back to the beginning of 1970s, when European countries developed unified standards for systems of administrative geography. It was […]

Shangjie Lai writes about the role of migration in transmission routes of malaria between sub-Saharan Africa and China. The international spread of infectious diseases including Plasmodium falciparum malaria has been accelerated by increasing human mobility via air travel over recent decades. An emerging route of P. falciparum infection is from Africa to China by Chinese […]

Roselinde van der Wiel writes about commitment in ‘living-apart-together’ (LAT) relationships and the factors underlying this commitment. In the past decades, new relationship types have arisen that suggest that commitment is of less importance in modern, individualized societies. ‘Living apart together’ (LAT) is one such relationship type. LAT refers to longer-term, monogamous partners who consider […]

The global population is ageing and many experts predict that this will have some negative consequences for society. But in new research, we examine whether the demographic transition also has important positive consequences, including the promotion and development of democracy. In 1970, only 8 per cent of the world’s population was classified as ‘old’ (aged […]

Katharina Wolf writes about gendered authorship in demographic publication. Attaining gender equality is one of the major challenges of today’s societies. In most Western countries women have reached parity or even outperformed men in terms of higher educational attainment. This development has been accompanied by women’s greater involvement in academic research output, which is one […]

Cori Ruktanochai presents maternal health outcomes at subnational level for five Sub Saharian African countries.

Antonio López-Gay, researcher at the Center for Demographic Studies in Barcelona, looks at the relationship between tourism and population change across Barcelona neighbourhoods. Neighborhoods and touristic apartments Cities are becoming a preferred touristic destination, and they are experiencing the emergence of a new source of touristic accommodation. In addition to the general increase in the […]

The European Population Conference is starting soon, what a better chance to come meet us at EPC! We would love to discuss our blog with you. You can find us throughout the conference, as we will all be presenting research in various sessions. In addition, Ridhi will be manning the Max Planck Institute booth on Thursday (17:30 – 19:00), […]

We know that exercise is good for us, but how does it really benefit our longevity and aging? Are our weekly gym sessions contributing to our longevity and the rate of aging? Our recent paper published in BMJ Open in collaboration with Polish researchers examined the rate of aging and mortality of Olympic athletes. The […]

This post by Evgenia Bystrov highlights the controversy around the ultimate causes of high fertility in Israel: religiosity or nationalism. There is a long-running debate on the drivers of fertility among Jews in Israel. Two papers in particular stand out: Friedlander and Feldmann’s (1993) and Anson and Meir’s (1996). Surprisingly, the papers reach a different […]

Brett Ory writes about childcare division within families based on the Generations and Gender Survey. International Women’s Day was last month and the take away message this year was much the same as in past years: Women have it better now than ever before, but it’s still not enough. While women in Western countries are […]

“You can’t always get what you want” sang Mick Jagger in 1969. Four decades and a whole fertility transition later, European women wishing to form a family are well aware of the meaning of these lyrics. Over these four decades, desired family size has not changed much, with a predominant preference for two children, while […]

In this article, Albert Esteve, Daniel Devolder, and Andreu Domingo provide new insights about childlessness in Spain, drawn from his recent research published in Perspectives Demogràfiques.childlessness in the Spanish context offering a cohort perspective. You can find the complete article on Perspectives Demogràfiques from Centre d’Estudis Demogràfics.

In this post Hildah Essendi (PhD) discusses her research on access to maternal and newborn care in two rural communities in Kenya. The efforts and commitments to accelerate progress towards the Millennium Development Goals for maternal and newborn health (MDGs 4 and 5) in low and middle income countries have focused primarily on providing key […]

The fields of epidemiology and demography are closely aligned. Even demographers interested in fertility or migration, not just mortality, can learn a great deal from epidemiology. As a recent study has argued, epidemiology is currently undergoing a methodological revolution, and this is likely to affect demography as well. The epidemiological revolution is, in fact, a […]

Markéta Ivánková introduces the changing interrelationship between female roles, cohabitation and Church’s expectations to these roles based on fiction and official documents from medieval Norway. Samboerskap, or cohabitation, is often thought of as a peculiarly modern phenomenon, associated with female emancipation and the sexual revolution, but in Norway its roots are to be found in the […]