Author Archives: demotrendsblog

The Art and Science of Being Uncertain

This post from Dr. Jakub Bijak from the University of Southampton discusses the challenges surrounding the management and communication of demographic uncertainty, and the methods available for approaching these problems. Some of the most captivating questions in contemporary demography are about what we do not know: the realms of uncertainty. This is especially visible in population forecasts, which […]

The Pride and Prejudice of Piketty

Prof. dr. Harry van Dalen on Thomas Piketty’s “Capital in the Twenty-First Century”. Anyone who has read his fair share of newspapers during the past year must have come across the name of Thomas Piketty and his plea to tackle the problem of income inequality. Numerous reviews and reactions have been raised. To name just […]

Maternal body composition and breast milk transfer in the context of the nutrition transition

Femke Hitzert won the NIDI Master Thesis Award in 2014 for her research on the association between maternal body composition and breast milk transfer. This guest post by Femke describes her findings. Breast milk is the most important source of nutrients for infants during the first six months of their life, which is underlined by […]

Fertility from a Bayesian perspective – worth trying?

This guest post by Beata Osiewalska discusses and describes her research on Bayesian approaches in fertility analysis. Is it possible to see the probability distribution over the number of children for a person with some particular demographic or socio-economic background? Have you ever wondered what this distribution would look like in your case? In this […]

Examining the Urban and the Rural

This is a post by Ashira Menashe-Oren on varying age structures between rural and urban areas in Sub-Saharan Africa and their consequences. The rural-urban dichotomy is the one of the most common classifications used to describe population distribution within a country. Available for many data sources, it is a simple binary measure. It is universally […]

The challenges in researching the demographic consequences of conflict: Reflections on the Sierra Leonean civil war, 1991-2002

This post is by Amie Kamanda, and discusses the importance of and challenges in investigating the demographic consequences of conflict. In particular, some of the problems in obtaining reliable data in times of conflict are discussed with reference to Amie’s work on the Civil War in Sierra Leone. Importance of researching the demographic consequences of conflict […]

Location, location, location! Why space matters in demography and why we should care.

Alessandra Carioli (Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute) prepared this overview based on her study presented at EPC 2014 in Budapest “A Spatial Analysis of Recent Fertility Patterns in Spain”. This study won one of the poster awards at EPC 2014 and is co-authored together with Daniel Devolder (Centre d’Estudis Demographics, UAB) and Joaquin Recaño (Centre d’Estudis […]

Probabilistic Population Projections: taking migration into account

Jonathan Azose is a PhD student at the University of Washington, United States. His research group focuses on probabilistic population projections, which looks to be an upcoming area in demography. In July 2014, the UN published probabilistic population projections for the first time. Probabilistic projections are nice in that they provide not only point projections, […]

Afghanistan: happy with high maternal mortality?

About the author of this post: Bart de Bruijn (PhD) is a demographer and development sociologist. As a consultant in population and development he provides technical assistance in the field of household surveys and population censuses to UN agencies and governments in developing countries and countries in transition. Since 2009 he is involved as Chief […]

Endogeneity vs causality in family research: is it always the chicken-and-egg problem?

This is a post by Evgenia Bystrov based on her article Testing the Second Demographic Transition Theory with Seemingly Unrelated Regression: Marital Postponement and Human Empowerment recently published in the European Sociological Review. The article focuses on the relations between values and marriage behaviour. The writing of this article was triggered by numerous academic debates […]

How to Tackle the Socioeconomic Inequalities of Teenage Pregnancy

This is a post by Heini Väisänen based on her article “Social Inequalities in Teenage Fertility Outcomes: Childbearing and Abortion Trends of Three Birth Cohorts in Finland”. Heini Väisänen is a PhD candidate in demography at the London School of Economics and Political Science. In the media, Finland is often displayed as an example of […]

Asking the experts about baby boomers

This is a post by Dr Meredith Tavener based on her article “Expert perceptions of the popular baby boomer image”. Dr Tavener is a Research Fellow at the Priority Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle, Australia.   No longer a secret: the world population is ageing! Accompanying some general concerns about […]

Changing patterns: Regional mortality differences and the East-West divide in Germany

Eva Kibele’s (E.U.B.Kibele@rug.nl) guest post is based on her PhD thesis “Regional mortality differences in Germany”, written while she was with the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research and supervised by James W. Vaupel, Gabriele Doblhammer and Vladimir Shkolnikov. Currently she is a postdoc researcher at the Population Research Center of the University of Groningen, […]

Chicken Little cried ‘Fertility is falling, fertility is falling, go tell the king’

This is a guest post by Ann Larson. Ann Larson is a demographer specializing in evaluating regional development and global health programs. She blogs from her home in rural Western Australia. In a recent tweet Demotrends shared a media report that France’s fertility was dipping below 2 children per woman.  Doom was predicted to inevitably follow—French women’s […]

Demographic situation and determination of pension age – the case of Turkey

İlker Şirin and Fanny Janssen discuss in their article “Determination of Ideal Pension Age and Developments in Ageing: a case study for Turkey” different measures, old-age definitions, and decision criteria that result in different alternatives for the ideal pension age. İlker Şirin introduces the main aspects of the article in this research spotlight. Population ageing is often discussed […]